Master’s in International Economics with a focus on China

MSc in Business and Economics | 1 year | 60 ECTS credits

Course content

Before the programme starts you will choose to follow either the economics specialisation or the policy and society specialisation.

The following list of courses summarises the suggested study programme.

Core courses (all students, 22.5 credits)

The following three courses combine a profound knowledge of China's economic macro-policies, micro-level development of markets and firms and China's embeddednes into the Asia Pacific growth region.

The objective is to introduce the major theoretical explanations for China's unprecedented growth performance over the last two decades. The course takes an institutional perspective which focuses on the role of the state as an arbiter of institutional change, the building and reform of market institutions, the emergence of different organisational forms and firm types, and the role of social institutions such as formal and informal networks.

Course code: NEKN74 | Download syllabus

This course explores and explains the processes of rapid industrialisation and socio-economic modernisation in China and the Asia Pacific drawing on a historically -comparative institutional approach. Fundamental factors and forces behind the economic transformation are analysed against the background of leading theories of economic development and social change.

The course is divided into two parts. The first part uses institutional theory to analyse the emergence of the so called East Asian model and its relevance for China. The institutional underpinnings of China's transformation to market economy are analysed in comparison with previous and contemporary development experiences in the Asia Pacific, from Japan to the ASEAN countries and India. Themes dealt with include agricultural modernization, trade, foreign investments and industrial policies. Concepts such as developmental state, export-led growth, and growth with equity are applied and critically analysed.

The second part deals with current trends and forces of globalisation in the Asia Pacific region and China's role as a leading regional economy and major player on a global scale. China’s trade policies, the impact of outward foreign investments and China’s role for emerging patterns of Asian regional integration are explored and analysed.

Course code: EKHM70 | Download syllabus

The course will specifically focus on the political economy of China’s ownership reforms and pursue an institutional analysis of the ongoing reforms. The course builds on the methodological framework of New Institutional Economics, to develop an understanding of the rapidly changing business system. Topics will deal with questions such as corporate governance under socialist leadership, the role of a business network within immature legal environments and resource constraints within a partially liberalized market.

Course code: NEKN75 | Download syllabus

Economics specialisation

The course presents modern microeconomic theory and a set of applications. The applications considered include: the theory of economic decision making under risk and uncertainty, noncooperative game theory and the basic concepts of dominance, Nash equilibrium, and subgame perfection, the theory of monopoly, oligopoly theory, developing game theoretic models of competition in prices and quantities as well as sequential competition, the basic theory of incentive problems created by asymmetric information about actions or states of nature. 

Course code: NEKN21 | Download syllabus

This course gives the basis that is needed to enable students to empirically analyse economic data without making unrealistic assumptions. Modern econometric techniques are treated, and at the same time considerable emphasis is placed on fundamental econometric thinking. Theoretical studies are interwoven with practical applications in the form of computer exercises.

Course code: NEKN31 | Download syllabus

The following courses give a summary of suggested electives. Other electives might be possible to attend depending on the students' specialisation and qualification. It is expected, however, that most students will follow the recommended courses.

  • Advanced Trade Theory
  • Economic Integration, Advanced Course
  • Time Series Analysis

Students have the opportunity to write their final thesis in China, where their fieldwork period begins with a week of intensive lectures and seminars at Fudan University (Shanghai). In the project paper, students should display their ability to apply, compile, and advance knowledge and skills acquired during the previous courses. Through the project students should demonstrate their ability to identify, analyse, and solve economic problems and to evaluate, present, and document their results.

Course code: NEKN03 | Download syllabus

Policy and Society specialisation

Econometrics 1 (7.5 credits)

The course is divided up into two parts. The first part consists of basic theory and methods relating to multivariate linear regression, limited dependent variable regression and time series analysis. It also considers how to apply these methods through examples of how such methods are used in economic history. This part also introduces computer software (e.g. Stata) for quantitative analysis. In the second part of the course, students analyse a quantitative problem using actual data from economic history, and report results in individual papers.

Econometrics II (7.5 credits)

The course consists of two parts. The first part consists of more advanced theory and methods relating to causal approaches surpassing the multivariate linear regression, limited dependent variable regression and time series analysis covered by Econometrics I. It also considers how to apply these methods through examples of how such methods are used in economic history. It discusses issues like selection bias, the bad control problem, and unobserved heterogeneity and the pitfalls associated with them as well as the possibilities to deal with these issues. This part advances the knowledge of empirical analysis making use of computer software (e.g. Stata). In the second part of the course, students independently analyse a more advanced quantitative problem using actual data from economic history, and report results in individual papers, showing awareness of the pros and cons of various causal approaches in econometrics.

The course presents the student with research methods used within the social sciences in general, and within economic history specifically. The course will carefully deal with the importance of source criticism to any well-planned research. It will then, through a detailed examination of various quantitative and qualitative methods, discuss the validity of these methods to various research questions and data. The overarching goal of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to prepare a well-structured research assignment.

Course code: EKHM73 | Download syllabus

The following courses give a summary of suggested electives. Other electives might be possible to attend depending on the students' specialisation and qualification. It is expected, however, that most students will follow the recommended courses.

  • Advanced Analysis of Economic Change
  • Consequences of Demographic Change
  • Human Capital in a Historical Perspective
  • Institutions, Economic Growth and Equality
  • Time Series Analysis
  • Innovation for Sustainable Development

Students have the opportunity to write their final thesis in China, where their fieldwork period begins with a week of intensive lectures and seminars at Fudan University (Shanghai). In the project paper, students should display their ability to apply, compile, and advance knowledge and skills acquired during the previous courses. Through the project students should demonstrate their ability to identify, analyse, and solve economic problems and to evaluate, present, and document their results.

Course code: EKHR81

Please note

This is a preliminary course list, and is intended as guidance only. The course list may be subject to change.