lunduniversity.lu.se

Master's programme in Economic Growth, Population and Development

MSc major Economic History | MSc major Economic Demography | MSc major Economic Development | 2 years | 120 credits

Course content

The programme is organised into three different tracks. When applying for the programme, you also select which track you are specialising in. The different tracks share courses to some extent.

The courses outlined below are track-specific and mandatory. You are also required to choose optional courses offered by the Department of Economic History, regardless of your chosen track. In addition, there may be courses offered by other departments that are possible to include in the chosen track.

Economic History (track 1)

This course studies historical processes of growth, convergence and divergence in the global economy over the past millennium. Two different approaches are applied. One considers theories of economic growth, about how production is generated by capital and labour and the level of technology. The other takes the perspective of the international economy and studies international trade, migration, and movements of capital. 

Course code: EKHM43 | Download curriculum

The course presents the student with research methods used within the social sciences in general, and within economic history specifically. The course will carefully deal with the importance of source criticism to any well-planned research. It will then, through a detailed examination of various quantitative and qualitative methods, discuss the validity of these methods to various research questions and data. The overarching goal of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to prepare a well-structured research assignment.

Course code: EKHM40 | Download curriculum

This course deals with the interplay between population and living standards in a long-term perspective. It focuses on three broader themes. In the first, different models of the pre-industrial economic demographic system are studied, and the legacy of these models (e.g. Malthusianism) and their relevance today is assessed. Different demographic indicators of living standards, such as life expectancy, infant mortality and demographic responses to economic fluctuations, are discussed and compared with other well-being indicators in an assessment of the long-term global development of standard of living. The second theme deals with the importance of population dynamics, especially fluctuations in fertility, and thus cohort size, on living standards in industrial society. The third theme focuses on the role of families and households in providing welfare and security of its members. Both the development over time and global comparisons are central in this theme. 

Course code: EKHM30 | Download curriculum

This course introduces major issues in long-term macroeconomic analysis and how these have been approached in research. Explorative methodologies versus hypothesis testing are discussed in relation to different scientific approaches. It is studied how data are obtained, analysed and interpreted by researchers. Basic concepts of quantitative analysis are introduced and applied in exercises.

Course code: EKHM80

This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with quantitative approaches to economic history. The first part consists of theory and methods relating to multivariate linear regression, limited dependent variable regression and basics of time series analysis. It also considers how to apply these methods, with examples of how such methods are used in economic demography and economic history. This part also introduces computer software (STATA or comparable) for quantitative analysis. In the second part of the course, students analyze a quantitative problem using actual data from economic demography or economic history, and report results in individual papers.

Course code: EKHM25 | Download curriculum

This course studies the relations between institutions, modern economic growth, and equality. Problems in the world of today are taken as a point of departure for an historical analysis that covers countries and regions in different parts of the world. Four themes are focussed. One is about the emergence of institutions such as property rights and markets, and their role for economic growth. The second is about the importance of the distribution of resources for institutional development. The third is about the importance of the growth of knowledge and education for the creation of equality of opportunity. The fourth is about the emergence of the modern welfare state as well as current challenges to its future.

Course code: EKHM42 | Download curriculum

During the second year, the department offer a selection of courses on a tutorial basis or in seminar form. They all discuss research related problems within their respective fields and involve students in the seminar discussions, based on readings from international research. It is mandatory to take two of these courses during the second year. The specific courses offered may vary from year to year, examples are given below:

Financial History (7.5 ECTS)
History of Economic Ideas (7.5 ECTS)
Inequality and Growth (7.5 ECTS)
Historical Economic Geography (7.5 ECTS)
Labour Markets and Industrial Relations (7.5 ECTS)
 

Economic Demography (track 2)

The course gives an introduction to demographic data, measurement and description of demographic phenomena. The course consists of two parts:

  • Demographic methods. Basic demographic measures and concepts are discussed, such as rates, the lexis diagram, life tables, fertility, nuptiality, mortality and migration measures.
  • Theories and evidence on global demographic change in an historical perspective. The long term demographic development in the world is discussed and related to different theoretical explanations.

Course code: EKHM24 | Download curriculum

This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with quantitative approaches to economic history. The first part consists of theory and methods relating to multivariate linear regression, limited dependent variable regression and basics of time series analysis. It also considers how to apply these methods, with examples of how such methods are used in economic demography and economic history. This part also introduces computer software (STATA or comparable) for quantitative analysis. In the second part of the course, students analyze a quantitative problem using actual data from economic demography or economic history, and report results in individual papers.

Course code: EKHM25 | Download curriculum

The course presents the student with research methods used within the social sciences in general, and within economic history specifically. The course will carefully deal with the importance of source criticism to any well-planned research. It will then, through a detailed examination of various quantitative and qualitative methods, discuss the validity of these methods to various research questions and data. The overarching goal of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to prepare a well-structured research assignment.

Course code: EKHM40 | Download curriculum

The course examines the impact of demographic change on the social and economic fabric of society, with a focus on issues of importance to today's policymakers. The impact of population aging will be examined in detail, as will the possible benefits / pitfalls of migration as a potential solution to population aging. The course will also examine the impacts of demographic change on individuals, through a discussion of the effects of cohort size on economic outcomes. The changing prospects for women in today's economy will also be analyzed within the framework of changing family structures. Governmental transfers dependent upon age structure, such as pension systems, will be studied, as will other aspects of intergenerational transfers.

Course code: EKHM41 | Download curriculum

Five different courses are offered: Health and Mortality, Population Aging, Marriage and Fertility, Immigration and Integration and Historical Demography. They are offered on a tutorial basis or in seminar form. They all discuss research related problems within their respective fields and involve students in the seminar discussions, based on readings from international research. It is mandatory to take two of these courses during the second year.

  • Health and Mortality (7.5 ECTS)
  • Population Aging (7.5 ECTS)
  • Marriage and Fertility (7.5 ECTS)
  • Immigration and Integration (7.5 ECTS)
  • Historical Demography (7.5 ECTS)

Economic Development (track 3)

This course examines growth dynamics of the developing world during the last decades, explored in a comparative and historical perspective. The question of why some developing economies have been able to set in motion catching-up processes, while others remain stagnant, will be discussed aided by historical-theoretical perspectives with the main focus on countries in Pacific Asia, Africa South of the Sahara and Latin America. It will be theoretically and empirically assessed to what extent the growth of the so-called global South might be sustained.

The course is divided into two parts. The first puts heavy emphasis on readings and lectures on analytical perspectives of development and catching up from the viewpoint of classical, although current, questions such as: the role of agricultural transformation, growth-inequality, market integration, possibilities for and experiences of industrial policy, technology transfer, social capabilities, market-state relationship, governance and domestic resource mobilization, poverty/human development.

The second part of the course is more student-driven and is devoted to seminar assignments where highly topical themes are discussed on the basis of available empirical data. Examples of questions to be addressed might be: south-to-south investments flows, the impact of China, the extent to which growth is commodity-driven, issues of improving competitiveness and productivity, forces behind poverty reduction. 

Course code: EKHM61

The course presents the student with research methods used within the social sciences in general, and within economic history specifically. The course will carefully deal with the importance of source criticism to any well-planned research. It will then, through a detailed examination of various quantitative and qualitative methods, discuss the validity of these methods to various research questions and data. The overarching goal of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to prepare a well-structured research assignment.

Course code: EKHM40 | Download curriculum

This course explores and explains the processes of rapid industrialisation and socio-economic modernisation in China and the Asia Pacific drawing on a historically -comparative institutional approach. Fundamental factors and forces behind the economic transformation are analysed against the background of leading theories of economic development and social change.

The course is divided into two parts. The first part uses institutional theory to analyse the emergence of the so called East Asian model and its relevance for China. The institutional underpinnings of China's transformation to market economy are analysed in comparison with previous and contemporary development experiences in the Asia Pacific, from Japan to the ASEAN countries. Themes dealt with include agricultural modernisation and industrial policy and concepts such as developmental state, export-led growth, and growth with equity are applied and critically analysed.

The second part deals with current trends and forces of globalisation in the Asia Pacific region and China's role as a leading regional economy. Trade policies, the impact of foreign investments and patterns of regional integration are explored and analysed.

Course code: EKHM31 | Download curriculum

This course studies the relations between institutions, modern economic growth, and equality. Problems in the world of today are taken as a point of departure for an historical analysis that covers countries and regions in different parts of the world. Four themes are focussed. One is about the emergence of institutions such as property rights and markets, and their role for economic growth. The second is about the importance of the distribution of resources for institutional development. The third is about the importance of the growth of knowledge and education for the creation of equality of opportunity. The fourth is about the emergence of the modern welfare state as well as current challenges to its future.

Course code: EKHM42 | Download curriculum

This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the theoretical and methodological problems associated with quantitative approaches to economic history. The first part consists of theory and methods relating to multivariate linear regression, limited dependent variable regression and basics of time series analysis. It also considers how to apply these methods, with examples of how such methods are used in economic demography and economic history. This part also introduces computer software (STATA or comparable) for quantitative analysis. In the second part of the course, students analyze a quantitative problem using actual data from economic demography or economic history, and report results in individual papers.

Course code: EKHM25 | Download curriculum

During the second year, the department offer a selection of courses on a tutorial basis or in seminar form. They all discuss research related problems within their respective fields and involve students in the seminar discussions, based on readings from international research. It is mandatory to take two of these courses during the second year. The specific courses offered may vary from year to year, examples are given below:

  • Poverty and Inequality Analysis: Data Management and Statistical Techniques
  • Agricultural Transformation in the Development Process
  • Explaining Growth and Inequality – Theory and its Application in Comparative Perspective
  • The Rise of the Rest: Africa and Latin America under Transformation
  • Development Aid in Historical Perspectives: Theory, Practice and Impact
  • The Periphery and Waves of Globalization
  • The State in Development
     

This is a preliminary course list, and is intended as guidance only. The course list may be subject to change.